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Author Archives: claire

Are you looking for a New Holistic Home to work from?

Room rental

Are you looking for a new Holistic Home to build your business.
I have availability in my beautiful treatment rooms for morning and evening slots.

This is the perfect time to join our team.
🌟If you would like to build your business and bring your existing clients into a caring and professional environment.
🌟Have the support from the amazing front of house team.
🌟Work alongside some of the best therapists in the business
🌟Have at least 2 years experience
Then this may the perfect opportunity for you.
I would love to have a chat and hopefully welcome you to your new Holistic Home.
Email me on claire@riverholistic.ie and we can make this happen.
Claire

Chakra cleansing with crystals

Before you begin to balance, rinse your crystals under cold running water. This removes any contaminants. You can also take notes and write down how you are feeling prior to the balancing process. Using your sage to clear your crystals releasing any negative energy and also clearing the space you intend to do this in. Before you place your crystals make sure to set your intentions of love and balance into them.

Relax and prepare to balance your chakras. Go to a quiet place and lay on your back. Take a few deep breaths and exhale slowly to relax. You can also set the mood with anything else you find relaxing such as music, nature sounds, light some incense or a candle.

  • As you inhale, imagine that you are breathing in a healing white light. As you exhale, imagine that you are breathing out all of your stress and negative emotions.
  • Your energy is connected to your thoughts. It is important that you have positive thoughts when you are trying to balance your chakras.

A very simple affirmation to have in your head is:

I am happy. My life is full of amazing people, opportunities and love. I am healthy and I have everything that I need. When I take a moment to pause and look at my life, I can see just how blessed I am for all the wonderful things that have formed in my life. I am beyond grateful and my life is full of abundance

Place the crystal on your chakra. Take the crystal that corresponds to your chakra and place it on that chakra. The energy of the crystal will vibrate and restore balance. Imagine that the crystal is glowing and spreading throughout your chakra.

You can place the crystals directly on your skin or on top of your clothes.

Location of each chakra on the body

Start at the root and work your way up. Place the crown chakra crystal right above your head instead of directly on your head

Allow the crystals to work. The crystals work on their own. You do not have to do anything extra. Leave them in place between five and 10 minutes, and then evaluate how you feel. Make mental or handwritten notes about how you feel. If you feel more balanced, remove the crystals. If you do not feel better, leave the crystals on for another five to 10 minutes.

Remove the crystals. Once you are finished with your session, remove each of the crystals. Start at the crown and work your way down. You do not have to deactivate your crystals.

  • Drink a lot of water after your session to continue the balancing process.

Other ways to use your chakra stones:

Sleeping with your crystals:

  • Sleep with a chakra bag. Clean your crystals and place them in a small bag. This bag should only be used to hold your crystals. Place the bag under your pillow when you go to sleep at night.
  • Before you go to sleep, ask the stones to balance you as you are sleeping.
  • You can use the affirmation from above or you can do a visual meditation before you go to sleep. Doing a body scan visualize each chakra at a time starting at the root chakra and working up. You can either see visualize the colour while doing these or send warmth and light to each chakra as you move your way towards the crown chakra.

Carry your crystals.

You can carry your crystals with you as you go about your day. You can carry all seven of your crystals with you, or you can just carry a few that you would like to focus on. Place the crystals as close to your body as you can

  • For example, if you are having problems in a relationship, you may carry aventurine crystal around with you to balance your heart chakra.
  • You can carry your crystals with you all day or for a specific situation. For example, if you are dealing with anxiety about a presentation you have to do, you may keep a obsidian (Root Chakra) and Sodalite (throat chakra) crystal in your pocket during your presentation. The obsidian will help you with your confidence and the Sodalite can help you with your communication.
  • Keeping crystals that correspond with each chakra in your pillowcase, under your pillow or under your mattress can help balance the chakras. You may experience more vivid or even lucid dreaming.
  • It helps just to keep the crystal close to you when sleeping and awake.

Selenite, should be cleansed with alternate methods (smoke, sound, moonlight, sunlight), as water will cause them to dissolve. Selenite can naturally charge your crystals for you.

Every full moon be sure to place your cystals somewhere that that they absorb new energy each month.

Smells like home

Smells like home…


For as long as I can remember, my mother always had a bottle of essential oils ready for nearly all of our minor ailments when growing up.
When it came to exam times, interviews even the debs, mam would just pop into her wooden box of magic and make up blends that we could apply to our pulse points or even to our clothes. Our house always smelled safe.
Some of these blends even today remind of feeling safe and secure rather than the stress I was going through at the time of applying them.
Aromatherapy is the practice of inhaling the scent of essential oils to improve your mental and physical well-being.
One theory of how they work is that by stimulating the smell receptors in your nose, they can send messages to your nervous system. They are also thought to have a subtle effect on the body’s chemical and energy systems. Because of this, aromatherapy is often used as a natural remedy to relieve anxiety and stress.
Essential oils must be diluted with a carrier oil before they’re applied to the skin. This reduces your risk of irritation. For adults, every 15 drops of essential oil should be diluted with 1 ounce of carrier oil. For children, the ratio is 3 to 6 drops of essential oil to 1 ounce of carrier oil. Some popular carrier oils are almond, coconut, and jojoba.
Essential oils should never be ingested, despite claims on the internet that suggest otherwise. There’s not enough research on any one essential oil to prove it’s safe to swallow. Each essential oil is very different, and some are toxic.

Below is a list of some of my favourite essentials oil for anxiety and stress.

Valerian

Valerian is an herb that has been used since ancient times. It’s thought to contain compounds that promote sleep and calm nerves. It can have a mild sedative effect on the body.
How to use: Add a few drops of valerian oil to an aromatherapy diffuser and inhale. Ideally use Valerian at home in the evening as it may make you sleepy or relaxed.

Lavender

Lavender is one of the most popular aromatherapy oils. Lavender aromatherapy is thought to calm anxiety by impacting the limbic system, the part of the brain that controls emotions.
How to use: Enjoy a relaxing lavender bath by combining several drops of lavender oil with a teaspoon of carrier oil or a small cup of milk to help it disperse properly. Stir the mixture into warm bathwater just before entering. lavender is also perfect to diffuse or pour a few drops onto a tissue and place it under your pillow.

Jasmine

Jasmine oil has a gorgeous floral scent. Inhaling jasmine oil can promote a sense of well-being and romance. Unlike some other essential oils used for anxiety, jasmine oil is thought to calm the nervous system without causing sleepiness.
How to use: Inhale jasmine oil directly from the bottle or allow the scent to fill the room through a diffuser. You can dilute jasmin with a carrier oil and massage into your pulse points and temples. DO NOT USE IF PREGNANT.

Sweet basil

Sweet basil essential oil comes from the same herb that you use in cooking. In aromatherapy, it’s thought to help calm the mind and relieve stress.
The phenol compounds in sweet basil oil helped relieve anxiety.
How to use: Add several drops of sweet basil oil to a room diffuser or inhale through an inhaler tube.

Bergamot

Bergamot oil comes from bergamot oranges and has an invigorating citrus scent. Bergamot helps relieve anxiety and improve mood.
When used topically, bergamot may increase sun sensitivity. I like to describe like an emotional hug for the soul.
How to use: Place a few drops of bergamot oil onto a cotton ball or tissue. Inhale the aroma two to three times to help relieve anxiety.

Chamomile

Chamomile is well-known for its relaxing and sedating properties and intoxicating scent. It is perfect for use for when you are feeling overwhelmed or very hyeractive children
How to use: Massage diluted chamomile oil into your skin, diffuse in a diffuser or add it to a warm bath.

Rose

Rose essential oil is extracted from rose petals. Roses have an enchanting floral scent known to relax the senses.
Using a rose aromatherapy footbath can reduce anxiety in pregnant women during labour. Not be used unless in labour.
How to use: Soak your feet in a basin filled with warm water and diluted Rose essential oil. You can also add rose oil to your favourite non-scented moisturizer or shea butter and massage into skin. (not be used in pregnancy unless in labour and even then less is more)

Vetiver

Vetiver may be less known than other essential oils, but it’s not less effective. Vetiver oil comes from the grassy vetiver plant native to India. It has a sweet, earthy scent and is used as an aid for insomnia and restlessness.
How to use: Enjoy a relaxing massage with diluted vetiver oil, or add it to a diffuser, you can also use River Holistic Mood blend, sweet dreams applied to your pulse points

Ylang Ylang

Floral-scented Ylang Ylang is used in aromatherapy to promote relaxation. Inhaling a blend of Ylang Ylang, lavender, and bergamot lowered stress and anxiety levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and serum cortisol.
How to use: Apply diluted Ylang Ylang to your skin, add to a room diffuser, or inhale directly from the bottle.

Frankincense

Frankincense oil is made from the resin of the Boswellia tree. It has a musky, sweet aroma that’s thought to ease anxiety. A beautiful massage blend of frankincense, lavender, and bergamot can improve anxiety, depression, and sometimes even pain in people with terminal cancer.
How to use: Massage diluted frankincense oil onto your hands or feet. You can also add frankincense to a diffuser.

Clary sage

Clary sage is different from the common herb used to make stuffing at Christmas. It has a woody, herbal odour. Due to its calming abilities, it’s often used as an relaxant.
Clary sage can ease tension and help control cortisol levels in women. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone. High cortisol levels may increase your risk of anxiety and depression.
How to use: Inhale clary sage oil directly when you feel anxious, or massage the diluted oil into your skin. Do not use clary sage while pregnant as it can cause contractions.

Patchouli

Musky patchouli is used in Ayurvedic medicine to relieve anxiety, stress, and depression. It’s often combined with other essential oils such as lavender. Patchouli is thought to promote calmness and relaxation.
How to use: To relieve anxiety, inhale patchouli oil directly or add it diluted to a warm bath or room diffuser.

Geranium

Geranium oil is distilled from the geranium plant.
For women in the first stage of labour, inhaling geranium oil effectively reduced their anxiety during labour. It may also help decrease diastolic blood pressure.
How to use: Apply a few drops geranium oil to a cotton ball and waft under your nose a few times.

Marjoram

Also known as oregano, sweet marjoram is thought to calm nervousness and anxiety. It’s also used to ease headaches, a common symptom of anxiety.
How to use: Dilute marjoram with a carrier oil and rub into your temples. You may also apply to your wrists or add to a diffuser.

Fennel

Fennel is best known as a cooking spice. It has an anise aroma and is used to treat many anxiety side effects such as digestive problems. It may also help relieve anxiety that’s related to menopause and other conditions.
Using fennel essential oil has been known to help menopause side effects such as anxiety, hot flashes, sleep problems, and depression.
How to use: Add diluted fennel oil to a warm bath to help relax your body and your mind.

What to do before use:

Essential oils may cause an allergic reaction when used topically. To avoid this, it’s important to do a patch test on a small area of skin before use.
Place a few drops of diluted essential oil on your wrist or elbow, and cover the spot with a bandage. Check the area in 24 hours. If you experience any redness, rash, or itching, the oil isn’t safe for you to use on your skin.
Essential oils aren’t safe for everyone. Talk to your doctor before using essential oils if you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, or have an underlying medical condition. You should also consult your doctor before using essential oils on children.
Remember: Not all essential oils are created equal, so you should only buy them from a reputable source.

Self Care is your hands ~ Part 4

Welcome to the fourth installment of the ‘Self Care is in your hands’.

This video will show you how to use hand reflexology points to help with Migraines and headaches. We all know that the route cause of migraines can differ greatly from person to person and the symptoms can be mild to severe. These points are all about maintenance, keeping the muscles loose around the head and neck, working on your stress levels and just learning to connect back into your body and breathe.

I do recommend that you work these points along with the stress points and spine moves at least once a day if you are prone to migraines.

Remember if you are pregnant you CANNOT work the downward release point in this video.

I hope you get something from this installment and the next issue will be about healthy reproductive system.

Claire

10 Ways to Cope with Anxiety and Stress

We all have things that trigger feelings of anxiety and stress. Some are small and insignificant, such as being stuck in traffic, and others are life disrupters that turn our world upside down. The one thing that’s certain is that trying to avoid those things that stress us is like trying to walk in between the raindrops in a thunderstorm.

The world we live in is only getting more complex. We are surrounded by choices. From the close to 100,000 drink combinations at Starbucks to the 27 apps on a typical smart phone. At times it seems that our ability to innovate has exceeded our ability to cope with innovation. It’s simply overwhelming.

Its’ no wonder that prescriptions for anti-anxiety meds have increased by 50% in the last 20 years.

Mobile technology isn’t helping any of this.

  • 50 percent of us check our e-mail or text messages before getting out of bed in the morning.
  • 60 percent of us sleep with our mobile devices in or near our bed (up to 79 percent for those under age fifty).
  • 30 percent of millennials actually sleep with their smart phone “in” their bed.
  • We spend on average of 5.5 hours on mobile devices daily, however 40 percent of 22-32 year-olds spend more than 13 thirteen hours a day on their mobile device!

It’s all pointing to the inevitable conclusion that we live in a world whose complexity, uncertainty, and volatility is increasing faster than our ability to cope. When the context of change exceeds your ability to cope it creates stress.

Since we’re clearly not going to slow down the overall rate of change in the world, there are only two ways to reduce stress. You either have to avoid the triggers or learn to better cope with them. Notice that I didn’t say you had to adapt to the change. The greatest myth we perpetrate in modern society is that we have a mandate to adapt and accept every change. While that sounds very progressive, it can actually create even more stress because now you are not only anxious about the change but you’re also setting a high bar that you have to hurdle by adapting to something your body and mind really do not like, which in turn creates even more stress.

The fact is that not all change is good change that contributes value and quality to our lives. Take my earlier example of driving in traffic. If I could show you a way to get to your destination that is faster, more pleasant, more scenic, and which contributes something positive to your life wouldn’t you choose that over adapting to the traffic?

Although we don’t like to admit it, that’s the way most stress works. We choose to stay in stressful situations because we actually adapt to the presence of stress and accept it as normal. That only makes stress a permanent part of your life. Chronic stress is not normal. It damages your body, dulls your mind, and depresses you emotionally. And then all of these in turn make it even harder to cope with the triggers that create the stress.

So how do you reduce stress? Here are 10 ways to start both eliminating the triggers of stress and anxiety and coping with those that you have no control over.

1) Get off of Social Media

I know, I’ve started with one of the hardest and most difficult stressors to eliminate. With smartphones we are tethered to social media like tagged wildlife. Worse yet, studies have shown that social media triggers addictive and obsessive responses in the brain. But it’s not just what social media does to your brain but also what it does to your workload. Eliminating social media is exceptionally effective at reducing the stress of not having enough time. We spend nearly 2 hours each day on social media sites such as Facebook, YouTube, Snapchat, Instagram, and Twitter, and exponentially more right now. What would your day feel like if you had two extra hours to do things that you really needed to do? Well, guess what? You just got those two hours. It’s up to you how you use them.

2) Take a Break

Small breaks every 15 minutes have been shown to have a tremendously positive effect on productivity and well being. The key here is to avoid falling into the trap of believing that simply bumping up against an obstacle repeatedly will cause it to give way. In many cases that’s only going to increase your stress and frustration. Imagine your car being stuck in deep snow while you just keep spinning your wheels and digging deeper and deeper into the snow making it harder and harder to get out. Instead take a step back. Clear your mind. And then revisit whatever it is you’re dealing with from a new perspective.

3) Talk it Out

Depending on what type of personality you are this may appear to be very natural or very painful. This of us who like to retreat into the confines of our own mind believe that we can somehow will our way out of just about anything by focusing hard enough without interruption. In fact the worst thing in the world you can do to me when I’m stuck and stressed is to try and talk to me. My instinct is to shut you down faster than I’d swat away an annoying fly. Yet, conversation is one of the most therapeutic forms of problem solving. Keep in mind that I’m not suggesting someone else has the answer, but that your talking it out will help you find an answer. Although I’ll admit to being the last one to take my own advice on this, I can attest that as a holistic practitioner I’ve never ceased to be amazed at how people usually figure out their own problems with nothing more than encouragement and a bit of objective perspective.

4) Take a Walk/ Workout

Cliche, right? Perhaps, but walking actually release the feel good cocktail of endorphins, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin which stimulates you brain and causes you to feel better about yourself and your situation. Again, the challenge is that we want to believe we can “deal” with the stressor and we see walking away as a loss, when the greater loss is in spending much more time than is needed or warranted trying to “figure it out.”

5) Read

This is another one of those activities that we often see as distracting us from the task at hand. Yet, I’ve found that few things stimulate my ability to think through a problem more than the simple act of reading. Sometimes I’ll stumble across a nugget of wisdom that is tangentially or even directly applicable to my challenge at hand. But most times it’s just a way to get my mind to divert from a train of thought that has been holding it hostage. We don’t want to admit how easily we can become near sighted and lose peripheral vision necessary to think creatively.

6) Write, But Don’t Judge

This is one of my favorites. Our brains are muscles. They work best when we exercise them. But they also need time to recover and rebuild. I’m convinced that moderate amounts of acute stress are a good thing. If you’re a small business owner it’s just part of your life. Yet, the periods of recovery in between the stress are critically important. One way to give your brain time to recover is to write, I’m not talking about writing anything deeply meaningful or, for that matter, even remotely interesting. Instead, my suggestion is to simply write with no judgement about what you’re writing or how you are writing it. When you’re done writing just toss it in folder of random thoughts and streams of consciousness. It’s no different than going to the gym to workout. You’re not doing anything permanent. You’re not building a stone wall when you lift weights. You’re not going anywhere on that treadmill, or exercise bike. But you do it because it has a long term impact on you. Same with writing. Just do it for 5-15 minutes — no judgment, no proofing–and see how much sharper you are

7) Take a Nap

“And just when am I supposed to do that?” you’re asking. Well, that is exactly the problem. Most of us do not get enough sleep to begin with. Short power naps are one way to improve that. According to WebMD, “Research shows longer naps help boost memory and enhance creativity. Slow-wave sleep — napping for approximately 30 to 60 minutes — is good for decision-making skills, such as memorizing vocabulary or recalling directions. Getting rapid eye movement or REM sleep, usually 60 to 90 minutes of napping, plays a key role in making new connections in the brain and solving creative problems.” Yes, I know, the guilt of daytime napping is a hard one to cope with, which may contribute its own form of stress. Then again, if you haven’t tried it you may be very pleasantly surprised at its benefits.

8) Meditate

People fall into two categories, those who meditate and those who haven’t yet. Once you do it’s amazing how drawn you will be to it whenever stress shows up. I’m not going to give you a meditation method here. You need to study it and develop your own approach to meditation What I will share is something a good friend once told me. Meditating is not about trying not to think, instead it’s about allowing your mind to wander where it will while you observe calmly and without judgment. All I can say is, try it.

9) Listen to Music

In the age of mobility it seems as though each of our lives has a soundtrack. It’s a good thing and it can help reduce stress significantly. A group of neuroscientists at Mindlab International in the U.K have come across a piece of music that they claim reduces overall anxiety by 65 percent and reduces physiological responses to anxiety by 35 percent. I’ve often found music, in general, to be a wonderful way to help my mind get into a sort of creative zone where ideas flow smoothly and that same feel-good brain cocktail gets released. After all, who among us hasn’t been caught coping with rush hour traffic by performing a bit of carpool karaoke?

10) Stop Asking “What if?”

Lastly, it’s one thing to deal with the stress of the present without adding to it the stress of the past. While there are many episodes in each of our lives that we carry forward, the worst sort of stress is the “what if” games we pay about the past. I’m going to be very blunt here. The only reason to second guess the past is because you are unhappy with where you are now. If that wasn’t the case there would be no reason to questions how you got here. So, if that’s the case what you really need to focus on is your situation right now, right here. Do that and the what if games come to an end. Don’t do it and I will guarantee you one thing. Several months or several years down the road you will say “what if” about today as well!

Will the ten ways I’ve described eliminate your stress? No. Some degree of stress is a normal response to the world we live in. If you weren’t periodically stressed you also would likely not feel much of anything else. We need the occasional thunderstorm in our lives. Most of us just don’t want to live in a perpetual monsoon.

Self Care is in your hands ~ Part 3

Hi Everyone,

Welcome to the next installment of Self Care is in your hands. Today I will be showing some very simple hand reflexology points for sinus congestion and the upper lymphatics.

More now than ever looking after yourselves should become part of our daily routines, not just when we are feeling unwell. By using these points in the video you can really help relieve that heavy feeling in your head and eyes you get when your sinuses are congested.

These points can be worked as often as you need.

I hope you enjoy and if you would like to look back at the previous videos on Neck, Back and shoulder tension and the Stress and Anxiety points, you can add them into your daily routine of self care.

Please just ask if you ave any questions

How to sage (smudge) to create a safe space in your home.

How to sage your home correctly 

Before lighting up your sage,  you should do a quick lap through your home and remove any excess clutter. Open all windows, closets, and doors in your home. 

Then, head to your favourite space in your home and place your sage into your shell. Burn a candle, set an intention, and then light the sage using the candle. Blow it out so the embers are glowing. With both hands, bring the smoke into your heart, over your head and down the front and back body to cleanse yourself.

Next, it’s time to get your smudge on. Starting on the lowest level of your space, move room to room and use your feather (if you have one) to waft the smoke into all four corners, where the ceiling and walls meet. Then, direct the smoke out through windows and doorways.

Once you’ve finished smudging, extinguish your sage by rubbing it in dirt or sand, on concrete, or stamping it out in a ceramic bowl. (Whatever you do, just don’t put sticks out in water—you won’t be able to use them again.) Return the shell and sage to your favourite space and give gratitude to the plant for its healing.  

After the smoke clears

Once we’ve cleansed a space, the energy often neutralizes. At this moment, it’s important to fill the space with the energy of love. This is where I recommend using the Palo Santo wood in the exact same process to welcome the positive energy into your home and heart.

You can choose to use either or both the Sage and Palo Santo, use what your heart tells you is right for the day.

I believe you should sage once a week. But like any kind of wellness practice, the more frequently you do it, the better. Morning time is the best however for the likes of a full moon ritual then you would practice this in the evening of the full moon.

Full Moon Ritual

The full moon is a perfect time to let thoughts and feelings go from your life that you no longer need, as it symbolizes a new phase in the world.

When doing a full Moon ritual, you will need very simple tools, your sage and or palo santo wood, your shell and stand,  a bowl of water, a candle and three pieces of blank paper to write down three things you want to let go of.

Make sure you are doing this in a comfortable space and somewhere that is safe to burn your sage or palo santo wood.  Remember to open the window in the room you are in, so the negative can leave your home.

Write down 1 thing you want to let go of on each piece of paper and fold them up.

Light your candle and place beside the bowl of water.

Choose 1 piece of paper at a time and set your intention to let this go from your life, take a deep breath and light it from the candle, then place in the water.

Do this for each thing you want to let go of and each time setting your intention.

Once all three things have been released from their hold on you, light your sage and smudge your head and heart and direct it out the window.

This is such a simple technique that you can do anytime you feel a little overwhelmed. 

Self Care is in your hands ~ Part 2

I am blown away by the response to the first installment of this series.

A lot of people including myself are feeling varying levels of stress and anxiety at the moment so I wanted to show you how I find these hand reflexology points help with grounding and helping with my breath, heart and mind.

They are perfect to show your kids and your loved ones.

I hope you get as much from them as I and my family do.

X

Claire

Self Care is in your hands

This is the first in a series of hand reflexology self help videos that you can use anytime anywhere.

The first video is all about back, neck and shoulder care. These points are perfect for helping with tension that can build up in these areas, especially at the moment with everyone working from home and not having the proper desk or chair at home.

I would recommend doing these simple moves at least three times a day with 5 minutes per hand.

Trust how it feels and don’t be shy of your pressure.

JUST BREATHE ~ PART 3

This is the final installment of the breathing techniques that I have been sharing on my social media channels Instagram and Facebook

I have really enjoyed researching and creating these really helpful techniques that can be adopted to all lifestyle and most age groups. My two boys have been doing these exercises with me each morning and they are only 4 and 8 years old. Reminding yourself to breathe may sound simple, but I even learned that we don’t always get that right.

By taking just a few minutes a day, I have felt calmer and grounded when it felt like the world was getting on top of me. This practice also taught me that I need to take myself away sometimes and just breathe.

1: KAPALABHATI (skull shining breathing)

  • Begin with a long, slow inhale
  • Follow it with a quick, powerful exhale generated from the lower belly.
  • Once comfortable with the contraction, up the pace to one inhale-exhale, (All through the nose) every one to two seconds, for a total of ten breaths.

2: BREATH COUNTING

  • To begin the exercise, count “ONE” to yourself as you exhale.
  • The next time you exhale, count “TWO,” and so on up to “FIVE”.
  • The begin a new cycle, counting “ONE” on the next exhalation.
  • Never count higher than “FIVE” and count only when you exhale. Try to do 10 minutes of this form of breathing.

3: PROGRESSIVE RELAXATION BREATHING

  • To nix tension from head to toe close your eyes.
  • Focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each.
  • Start with your feet and toes, the move up to your knees, thighs, glutes, arms, hands, neck, jaw and eyes, all while maintaining deep, slow breaths.
  • You can do this as often as you like.

4: BREATH MOVING

  • As you breathe in imagine you are moving your breath to the top of your head.
  • As you breath out, imagine you are moving your breath to the base of your spine, your perineum, your tailbone.
  • Each time you breathe in,move the breath to the top of your head.
  • Each time you breathe out, move the breath to the base of your spine.
  • Breathe in this circuit for ten cycles.

5: PURSED LIPS BREATHING

  • Breathe in through your nose (as if you are smelling something), for about two seconds.
  • Pucker your lips like you are getting ready to blow out some birthday cake candles.
  • Breathe out slowly through pursed lips two to three times as long as you breathed in.
  • Repeat.

6: ABDOMINAL BREATHING

  • Place your left hand on your abdomen and your right hand on your chest.
  • Practice filling your lower lungs by breathing so that your left hand goes up when you in inhale and your right hand remains still. Always inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth.
  • When you have filled and emptied your lower lungs eight to ten times, add the second step t your breathing: Inhale first into your lower lungs as before, and then continue inhaling into your upper chest.
  • As you exhale slowly through your mouth, make a whooshing sound as your left hand falls first, and then your right hand. As you exhale feel the tension leaving your body as you become more and more relaxed.
  • Practice breathing in and out in this manner for three to five minutes. Notice that the movement of your abdomen and chest is like rolling waves and falling in a rhythmic motion.