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FACT Mindfulness Skills Course

FACT Mindfulness Skills Course 

Mindfulness is an awareness process that involves the ability to pay attention with flexibility, openness and curiosity to life as it arises at any given moment. It is a practice when cultivated, that enables people to interact with themselves and others through awareness and compassion, handling life’s stresses and challenges with more ease and resilience. Ultimately, it teaches us to accept and respond, instead of react to life.

Aim
The aim of this six week course is to introduce clients to the practice of mindfulness in their everyday lives while simultaneously being held within a psychotherapeutic space. This one-to-one experience fosters a tailored and unique mindful environment.

Week 1: – Introduction to course and exploration of relevant life issues and expectations
Week 2: – Stopping, calming, resting and healing
Week 3: – Nourishing happiness and sustaining mindfulness
Week 4: – Understanding and transforming ingrained habits
Week 5: – Developing conscious awareness and maintaining happiness
Week 6: – Establishing mindfulness practice in daily life.

Psychotherapeutic Approach
Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (FACT) is a progressive evidence based psychotherapeutic behavioural intervention designed specifically for brief therapy. FACT encourages psychological flexibility in clients and integrates mindfulness in its approach.

Outcome
At the end of this course clients will be able to understand how to recognise and handle difficult thoughts and strong emotions within themselves related to stress, pain (including physical), anxiety, fear, sadness and anger etc. They will have developed awareness on the factors that influence and perpetuate much of the patterns of suffering within their lives and have gained the knowledge and skills necessary to make alternate and more life affirming choices within their respective environments.

For further information:

To make an appointment with Niamh, please contact her directly on the information below.

Niamh is available for appointments here at the centre on Monday’s from 11am to 3pm 

MINDFUL MEASURES

087-9828707

 

 

Meditation is good for your heart health

In the immensely stressful lives that we are living in the present times, it becomes imperative to include practices such as meditation and yoga in our lifestyle. Apart from reducing stress and generating immense positivity, meditation helps in keeping our heart healthy as well. People who meditate regularly are lesser prone to risks of heart attack and stroke. Meditation can produce changes in the brain activity and can also control heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate and release of cortisol hormone in response to stress.

What is meditation?
Meditation means awareness. Anything which is done with awareness is meditation. It is not a technique but a way of life. Meditation is referred to a stage of consciousness when the mind is free of scattered thoughts and ideas. It is considered as a practice which transforms the mind. It helps in improving concentration, helps in getting more clarity, provides emotional positivity and helps a person have a calm way of looking at the nature of things.

Engaging in meditation enables a person to learn about his/her patterns and habits of mind. It helps a person cultivate new and more positive ways of living. A nourished and positive thinking mind can further transform into extremely peaceful and energised state of mind. Inculcating the habit of meditation in your lifestyle can make you a more enlightened person personally and publically.

meditation
Regular meditation can make you a more enlightened person

There are various kinds of meditation which provides several physiological benefits. Mindful meditation helps you focus efficiently in the present and accept it without any judgement. Guided meditation, for instance, a kind of meditation which uses mental images, helps you relax and calm down. Transcendental medication is a kind of meditation which uses repeated sounds and phrases in order to clear your mind.

These meditations need to be done for at least 10 minutes in a day in order to get physiological benefits from them.

How meditation helps your heart?
The National Institute of Mental Health states that around 19% adults experience anxiety within the past year. Around 31% adults were reported to suffer from anxiety disorder at some point in their lifetime. We all experience stress in one way or the other. Excessive stress can contribute to high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, overeating and physical inactivity. All these factors contribute to increased risks of stroke and heart disease.

Mindful meditation helps in reducing both stress and anxiety. Meditating regularly gives a boost to the immunity, eases inflammation in chronic conditions and reduces pain. Those who meditate regularly experience increase in gray matter in the brain, have improved levels of focus and concentration, reduced levels of stress and more will power.

Mindful meditation, when combined with cognitive behavioral therapy can thus be considered as an effective treatment for anxiety.

We have a number of one to one therapies here at the centre from Psychotherapy , HypnotherapyAcupuncture  to name but a few.

We also a number of classes that are a perfect introduction to meditation and mindfulness along with weekly Yoga,

For a full list of our weekly classes just follow HERE… 

Source: 

Reduce stress with good communication

Reduce stress with good communication

At work and at home, the ability to communicate effectively can improve your relationships and resolve conflicts that cause stress.

Good communication is crucial for reducing your stress levels.  When we are misunderstood or criticised, we feel isolated and defensive.  When conflict arises at home or at work and we cannot discuss it in a constructive way, we often feel stressed and angry.

In any situation, let the other person know you are listening by nodding and making eye contact.  Respond regularly by saying “yes” or “uhuh” and don’t be afraid to ask for an explanation if you don’t understand.

Dealing with Conflict:

Remember that constructive criticism is the best way to deal with any conflict.  Always refer to the person’s actions and behaviour, not to the person, for example “I disagree with the way you handle our child”, not “you’re a bad parent”.  Equally, if someone is criticising you, try to listen without becoming defensive.

Express your feelings:

It’s not always possible to avoid stress, but you can learn to cope with it better.  Expressing your feelings can dramatically reduce stress levels and enhance your own sense of well-being.

Explore your feelings:

Get in touch with your feelings.  Being aware of how you feel – whether it’s anxious, depressed or angry – is the first step to dealing with a stressful problem.  This means taking time out from work and family to be alone.  Keep a journal, take a walk on the beach or go and see a counsellor or therapist. Be honest with yourself.

Confide in a friend:

At times of stress, we all need support from our friends and family.  If you feel overwhelmed by events, it is good to get a new perspective on the problem.  Share your feelings with the people who you trust, so you don’t end up feeling exposed and even more stressed.  But remember, friends may have their own problems so be prepared to listen as well as talk.

 

Time is right:

Choose a time when the other person can listen – not when they are rushing out the door.  If your friend is too busy, let them know you have a problem and ask if they set aside some time in the near future for you to talk.

Say what you mean:

Never be afraid to say what you think, feel or believe.  If you disagree with someone, try to say so.  This can be hard if you are afraid they will be upset or angry, but in the long run communicating clearly will lead to better relationships and lower stress levels.

Keep to the facts:

Under stress it is easy to distort problems, exaggerate the significance of an event or make sweeping generalizations.  When explaining a problem to problem to someone, always be as specific and objective as you can.

It’s okay to cry:

Cry when you feel hurt or grief.  These feelings are the natural result of change and loss and a good cry and get them off your chest.  Make time to honour and express your feelings.  Perform a simple ritual like lighting a candle.  Not giving yourself time to grieve can cause long-term stress and damage your health.

Saying sorry:

Take responsibility for your mistakes and feelings of remorse or guilt.  Making amends will relieve your stress and improve your relationships.  Write a card if you can’t say it in person.  Once you have righted any wrongs, you’ll be able to move on and leave your feelings of guilt behind.

Be kind to yourself:

Give yourself time to feel happy!  Stressed people often don’t take time to laugh and feel pleasure and pride in their own achievements.  Tell a friend why you’re proud of yourself.  Go out and celebrate. or buy yourself something nice, or book a treatment and we will look after you.

8 steps to well expressed anger

  1. Never shout or hit another person when you are angry

  2. Be direct and assertive.  Don’t express anger in passive ways such as the ‘silent treatment’

  3. Discharge aggression by hitting pillows or screaming into pillows, or do some strenuous exercise.

  4. Put your anger into words.  Before you approach the person, write down “I am angry because…”.

  5. Tell the person why you are angry in as calm and reasonable a tone as possible.

  6. If you become furious again, ask if you can leave the conversation and come back when you feel calmer and express your thoughts more clearly.

  7. Give the other person time to respond.  Remember that many people find anger frightening.

  8. Be brave – expressing anger doesn’t have to mean being out of control.

 

5 Small Steps for Improving Your Self Esteem

Five Small Steps For Improving Your Self Esteem

 

Your self-esteem is a delicate creature. It can be damaged by many things – a break up of a relationship, a change in life or work circumstances – any dent in your sense of identity can leave you feeling less yourself and cause you to suffer a loss of self confidence.

Some people are naturally more self-confident than others, and for some, like myself, it doesn’t take much at all to leave you questioning yourself and your life choices.

When your confidence is at an all time low, it can be difficult to think of practical steps to make you feel better. The natural reaction to pain is for you to withdraw to protect yourself, and so you may begin to pull away from socialising or situations that put you at risk from feeling even worse. When you’re feeling at your lowest and most delicate, it’s all about taking small steps to make an overall big difference.

The WORST thing you can do is to push yourself too hard, and try to make big changes all at once. When you’re delicate, any knock is going to be felt even more acutely, sending you flying back in the opposite direction.

Start small by trying some of the following things.

1. Try Something New

It may seem like the opposite of what you want to do when you’re not feeling good about yourself, but gaining knowledge or learning a new skill can actually make us feel a lot better about ourselves. Learning new things has been found to be a core need for psychological wellbeing. This doesn’t necessarily mean throwing yourself in the deep end and learning something like kite surfing or mountaineering – even something like an online course, or local exercise class can make you feel better about yourself, and introduce you to new people you wouldn’t have met otherwise.

  1. Positive Self-Talk

We are generally not very good at talking ourselves up. We feel embarrassed to admit that we’re any good at anything, and yet we know that we are our own worst enemy.

So, just for a minute, leave the modesty at the gate, and try this psychiatry endorsed “brainwashing” technique to see if it makes a difference. Making a list of 5 things that you love about yourself and reviewing this list daily for one month, has been proven to have a positive effect on self image and self esteem.

 

  1. Take Care of Yourself

When you’re thinking negatively about yourself, it can be easy to fall into a pattern of self- neglect. Taking care of your physical self is the first step to repairing your mental wellbeing. Try simple things such as making yourself healthy, delicious dinners, or making sure that you go out for a long walk every day. Exercise has also been consistently found to improve mood, and your overall self- confidence.  Make taking care of yourself a priority rather than an afterthought

  1. Be Kind to Yourself – Spend time doing things you enjoy.

Think about what you would do for a friend if they were feeling down. Would you force them to start on their to-do list, or tell them they need to ‘pull themselves together and sort themselves out!’. No – of course you wouldn’t! You’d spend some time with them, listening and doing something that they wanted to do, like go for a coffee, or a walk, or to the cinema. Treat yourself like you would treat a friend. Allowing ourselves time to do the things we enjoy is another important act of self-love, it signals that we respect ourselves enough to allow ourselves happiness. Once our mind is clearer, we can concentrate on the more ‘pressing issues’ of the day.

  1. Help Others

The Dali Lama was certainly on the right track when he said “Our prime purpose in life is to help others”.

Sometimes when we are thinking negatively about ourselves, it can help to focus our attention outward by helping other people. Not only does this distract us from the negative self-talk in our heads, but as a result of helping others, our own self-esteem increases. Psychologists have discovered a direct link between volunteering and levels of self esteem. I’m not talking about saving the world, but a few hours spent a week volunteering for a charity, or even popping round to see an elderly neighbour can have huge mutually beneficial benefits!

We have some amazing talk therapists in house if you feel like you need someone to talk to.

Dr. Zuleika Daly

Tomas West

Grainne Jordan

 

 

 

Source: Huffington Post UK

The Antidote to Fear

The Antidote to Fear

Whether you’re scared of change, success or failure… it’s worth remembering that fear is a universal experience.

The problem is that most people see fear as a sign of weakness.

Yet it’s a natural human response to pushing yourself outside of your comfort zone and trying something new (as well, of course, if your life is in danger and you’re being chased by a predator… even if you’re thinking of being chased by a predator).

There’s a belief that when you’re confident, fear will go away, However that isn’t the case.

It’s simply that your relationship with fear changes so you can handle it better.

Whenever I start a new project, teach a new group, or even sometimes when I’m seeing a new client for the first time, fear raises its head.

My fear says things like ‘Be careful… don’t go putting yourself out there! What if people don’t like what you have to say?’ or ‘Be careful… what if you can’t help this person? Maybe you’ll fail this time…’.

I tell my fear ‘Not Now!’ and return my focus back to my task.

If you’re feeling fear while you’re taking the action, use it to your advantage.

Fear can actually heighten performance as you’re more alert and focused – provided you claim power over your thoughts and drive the energy to where you need it most (not to running away and hiding from what scares you).

The antidote to fear is to see it for what it is, to recognise and acknowledge it – and move on in spite of it.

Because if you don’t take action, your fear increases and keeps you even more stuck.

So, if there’s something you want to do that you’re being held back by from fear, know that the fear will subside once you’ve taken action.

What gives fear power is you listening to it for so long!

If you would like to discuss your power to work with your fear, we have some amazing talk therapists here at the centre.

Hypnotherapy and Psychotherapy for our talk therapies More

Meditation, Mindfulness and Yoga for our relaxation therapies MORE

And well we are just here to help you be the best that you can be, so you can just pop in and have achat and we can find the right approach for you.

Claire

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